Walk inside a giant dazzling Kaleidoscope created by Laura Buckley for new Saatchi show

Laura Buckley, Fata Morgana, 2012. © Laura Buckley, 2012 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

This March, why not pop along to the Saatchi Gallery in London and walk into Laura Buckley's dazzling and disorientating large-scale kaleidoscope?

Named Fata Morgana, the immersive piece is part of a new exhibition, entitled Kaleidoscope, inviting you to be absorbed into Laura's work through its mirrored walls, changing imagery and audio.

Laura Buckley is joined by eight other international contemporary artists, working across a variety of mediums. The show, which launches on 15 March, examines the distortion of human perception, moving from normal domestic spaces to turbulent nautical vistas and eventually complete abstraction.

From the disruptive work of Mia Feuer, who addresses the post-natural landscape and our effect on it, to Pierre Carreau’s emotionally charged depictions of waves, the diverse media on display form a kaleidoscopic representation of the world, revealing a constantly changing sequence of elements and mediums.

Mia Feuer, Dog Sled, 2013. © Mia Feuer, 2013 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Mia Feuer, Dog Sled, 2013. © Mia Feuer, 2013 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Pierre Carreau #2218 – Number 2, 2015. © Pierre Carreau, 2015 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Pierre Carreau #2218 – Number 2, 2015. © Pierre Carreau, 2015 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Other featured artists include Tillman Kaiser whose dynamic paintings and sculptural works are meditations of history, style and form; Whitney Bedford whose tempestuous seascapes act as motifs for connecting the past and the present, and the young painter Florence Hutchings who will be presenting a series of vivid still-life paintings inspired by the domestic scenes of everyday life.

Florence kitchenettes and stovetops, for instance, are turned into abstract cutouts in the style of Henri Matisse and Georges Braque. Florence is a master of colour with her unique use of pinks, greens and reds and her vibrant still life pieces have also gathered her a significant following on Instagram.

“I love colour, it’s something that never ceases to be fun and surprising," Florence told Creative Boom. "Looking at artists I love always helps me in terms of colour reference. From Matisse’s use of red to Braque’s use of brown and Francis Bacon’s use of orange; it’s part of what makes the process of painting so exciting for me."

Whitney Bedford Untitled (Encontros e Despendidas), 2005. © Whitney Bedford, 2005 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Whitney Bedford Untitled (Encontros e Despendidas), 2005. © Whitney Bedford, 2005 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Florence Hutchings, Clothes on a rail, 2017. © Florence Hutchings, 2017 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Florence Hutchings, Clothes on a rail, 2017. © Florence Hutchings, 2017 Image courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London

Kaleidoscope at London's Saatchi Gallery aims to be a timely exploration of our relationship with our surroundings, asking us all to reconsider the way we engage with our environment – and indeed art itself – with our senses. Launching on 15 March, it will run until 5 May 2019.