New exhibition looks at the ground-breaking era of British Pop Art in the 1950s and '60s

Peter Blake, Girls with their Hero, 1959 - 62, acrylic on board , Pallant House Gallery (Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, 2006) © Peter Blake . All rights reserved, DACS 2018

In the 1950s and 1960s, a generation of artists led by Eduardo Paolozzi, Richard Hamilton and Peter Blake responded to a radical cultural shift in Britain, addressing the rise of mass media, the cult of celebrity, questions of identity and prevalent political issues – all concerns still relevant today.

They adopted imagery from a wide range of cultural sources including advertising, comics, science fiction and contemporary music; they embraced non-traditional techniques such as screen printing and unconventional materials such as commercial house paints and ‘found objects’. They challenged thinking about art and mass media, democratising art in the post-war period by questioning the traditional division between high and low art.

Now you can see their impact through a major spring exhibition at Pallant House Gallery in Chichester, running until 7 May 2018. If you didn't already know, the Gallery holds one of the largest public collections of British Pop Art internationally, formed by the architects Colin St John Wilson and MJ Long and gifted to Pallant House Gallery in 2006. The exhibition celebrates this extensive body of paintings, sculpture and prints created in the two decades that followed the Second World War.

Explored through a series of themes, POP! Art in a Changing Britain demonstrates the breadth of British Pop Art and the complexity of its definition, presenting ‘Pop’ as an attitude with a lasting legacy. Discover more about the exhibition at pallant.org.uk.

Antony Donaldson,   Hollywood  1968, Fibreglass, Pallant House Gallery,   (donated by the artist throug  h The Mayor Gallery, 2018) © The Artist,   courtesy The Mayor Gallery, London.

Antony Donaldson, Hollywood 1968, Fibreglass, Pallant House Gallery, (donated by the artist throug h The Mayor Gallery, 2018) © The Artist, courtesy The Mayor Gallery, London.

Gerald Laing,   ‘  Brigitte Bardot  ’ from ‘Baby Baby Wild Things’, 1968,   screenprint  (1/6)  , Pallant House Gallery (On loan from  Lyndsey Ingram)  © The Estate of Gerald Laing,  2018.

Gerald Laing, ‘ Brigitte Bardot ’ from ‘Baby Baby Wild Things’, 1968, screenprint (1/6) , Pallant House Gallery (On loan from Lyndsey Ingram) © The Estate of Gerald Laing, 2018.

Cowboy, 1964, fabric, Pallant House Gallery (Wilson Gift through   The Art Fund, 2006)  © Jann Haworth

Cowboy, 1964, fabric, Pallant House Gallery (Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, 2006) © Jann Haworth

DACS 2018 Joe Tilson, 1 - 5 T he Senses, 1963, mixed media, Pallant House Gallery (Wils on Loan, 2006) © Joe Tilson

DACS 2018 Joe Tilson, 1 - 5 T he Senses, 1963, mixed media, Pallant House Gallery (Wils on Loan, 2006) © Joe Tilson

R.B Kitaj, For Fear from the ‘Mahler Becomes Politics,   Beisbol’, 1964  -  67  , screenprint, Pallant House Gallery   (Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, 2006) © The Estate   of R B Kitaj

R.B Kitaj, For Fear from the ‘Mahler Becomes Politics, Beisbol’, 1964 - 67 , screenprint, Pallant House Gallery (Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, 2006) © The Estate of R B Kitaj

R.B Kitaj, Plays for Total Stakes, 1968, screenprint, Pallant House   Gallery (Wilson Family Loan, 2006)  © The Estate of R B Kitaj

R.B Kitaj, Plays for Total Stakes, 1968, screenprint, Pallant House Gallery (Wilson Family Loan, 2006) © The Estate of R B Kitaj

Richard Hamilton, Hers is a Lush Situation, 1958, Pallant House Gallery (Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, 2006) © The Estate of the Artist. All rights reserved, DACS 2018

Richard Hamilton, Hers is a Lush Situation, 1958, Pallant House Gallery (Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, 2006) © The Estate of the Artist. All rights reserved, DACS 2018