Glitz, Glamour and Grit in the work of iconic photographer Kenneth Van Sickle

All images courtesy of Damiani. © Ken Van Sickle

If it happened in the past six decades and was worth photographing, you can be pretty sure Kevin Van Sickle photographed it.

From Andy Warhol's Factory to the Greenwich Village haunts of the beat poets to Paris’ sartorial superstars, he’s been there, he’s turned his lens on it, and he’s captured it as a snapshot in time.

Van Sickle was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Van Sickle learned the basics of drawing, painting and composition from his grandfather and later studied under George Grosz at the Art Students League and cubist painter André Lhote in Paris. Now, 140 of his images from 1952 to the present are being drawn together in a new book introduced by Jim Wintner.

“Van Sickle came early to photography, assisted Robert Frank, and is known for his atmospheric images of New York and Paris,” says publisher Damiani. “His travels to France heavily influenced his work, manifesting a pastoral and salon style appeal.”

For all the glitz and glamour Van Sickle was privy to, some of his most powerful images are those that draw on the grittier side of life. His works are intimate and beautifully composed, echoing the work of artists like Henri Cartier-Bresson. We feel almost like we’re there with the subjects; even those from a good 70 years ago.

Kenneth Van Sickle: Photography is published by Damiani in April, priced $50.

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle

© Ken Van Sickle