Estuary installation at Fluid Matter exhibition showcases fluorescent algae bio art

We've come to expect big things from Eindhoven's creative scene over the past few years – from art to surface design, the recent innovations to explode on to the city's creative scene have taken the industry by storm. And this latest exhibition at the MU Artspace certainly doesn't disappoint.

On show as part of Fluid Matter, the Estuary installation is a fluorescent delight. The gallery explains the inspiration behind the vibrant piece: "Estuaries are transition zones between fresh water and salt water environments. The inflows of both sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients in the water, making these areas extremely productive natural habitats. With sixty percent of mankind living alongside estuaries, the anthropogenic influence on their biology is considerable.

"Estuary forces saline and fresh water fluids together in a closed climate. As the present salt water organisms battle decay due to their hostile environment, an abundance of fresh water life originates from its forced death. What’s visible is the colourful behaviour of living organisms struggling to manage a situation influenced, or even orchestrated by man."

All of the hues are fully natural, with the installation constantly changing colour thanks to the decaying algae and thriving microbes. The algae has been harvested from the former Dutch estuary Oosterschelde – famous for its storm surge barrier.

Alongside Estuary, an installation entitled Genesis explores the colour properties of extremophiles – microbes that can survive or even thrive under extreme conditions.

The Fluid Matter Exhibition, curated by William Myers & Angelique Spaninks, is now on at MU Artspace, Eindhoven. It runs until February 23rd. For more information, visit www.mu.nl.

Via Creative Boom submission | All images © Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk

© Xandra van der Eijk