Cindy Sherman transforms herself into androgynous characters to explore gender

Cindy Sherman Untitled #603, 2019 dye sublimation print 84 3/4 x 77 inches 215.3 x 195.6 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Cindy Sherman is widely recognised as one of the most important artists of the 20th century and continues to be an influential figure worldwide. Her work consists primarily of photographic self-portraits, and for her latest project – opening at Metro Pictures on Saturday 26 September – she has transformed herself into an extraordinary cast of androgynous characters, expanding her career-long investigation into the nature of identity and representation.

The figures pictured in the 10 images are dressed primarily in men’s designer clothing and are posed in front of digitally manipulated backgrounds composed from photographs she took while travelling through Bavaria, Shanghai, and the UK.

This is not the first time the American artist has played with gender stereotypes. In her 'Doctor and Nurse' series she dressed as both a male and female character, embodying mid-century professional archetypes, while in 'History Portrait' Sherman she appeared as both male aristocrats and clergymen. In her more recent clown series, she donned layers of face paint and shapeless costumes to play with genderless appearance.

Sherman will also be the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris that runs from 23 September 23 through 3 January 2021.

Cindy Sherman Untitled #602, 2019 dye sublimation print 76 1/4 x 87 1/2 inches  193.7 x 222.3 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Cindy Sherman Untitled #602, 2019 dye sublimation print 76 1/4 x 87 1/2 inches 193.7 x 222.3 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Cindy Sherman Untitled #611, 2019 dye sublimation print 91 x 107 1/4 inches  231.1 x 272.4 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Cindy Sherman Untitled #611, 2019 dye sublimation print 91 x 107 1/4 inches 231.1 x 272.4 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York