Artist weaves 60 miles of colourful thread to create spectacular indoor rainbows

Image credit: Ron Blunt

When Texas-based Mexican artist Gabriel Dawe was given free reign of Smithsonian American Art Museum‘s Renwick Gallery, he decided to use 60 miles of colourful thread to create incredible floor-to-ceiling rainbows, spanning the entire space.

Known for his architectural scaled weavings, which are often mistaken for fleeting rays of light, Dawe is apparently inspired by memories of the skies above Mexico City and East Texas, his childhood and current homes, respectively. The material and vivid colours also recall the embroideries found everywhere in production during Dawe’s upbringing.

To craft his spectacular installations, Dawe individually sets each sewing thread, from floor to ceiling, to create a huge spectrum of colour. Using 15 shades that represent the full spectrum of visible light, his 'Plexus A1' series took 10 days to complete with layer upon layer of polyester thread. Here, we share some images of the exhibition, along with further similar work.

Originally from Mexico City, Dawe creates site-specific installations that explore the connection between fashion and architecture, and how they relate to the human need for shelter in all its shapes and forms. His work is centred around the exploration of textiles, aiming to examine the complicated construction of gender and identity in his native Mexico and attempting to subvert the notions of masculinity and machismo prevalent in the present day.

His work has been exhibited internationally and he recently obtained his MFA at the University of Texas at Dallas. Discover more at www.gabrieldawe.com.

Image credit: Ron Blunt

Image credit: Ron Blunt