Andrew Munks' utterly wonderful photographs of fish in hats and wigs

All images courtesy of Andrew Munks

In news we learned all too recently, there are few things more heartwarming than seeing a little fish wearing a hat.

For that discovery, we’ve got artist Andrew Munks to thank: over the past couple of years he’s built his practice around painstakingly popping little hats and wigs onto fish and photographing them with lightning speed before his subjects shake off their little accoutrements into the water.

A new show at London’s Zabludowicz Collection presents a few of these surreally joyful pieces in an exhibition entitled Plop Shop, displaying them alongside some charming old telephones dotted about the space for visitors to hear oddly disjointed yet rather compelling snippets of information and interviews.

London-based Munks is a keen angler – obviously a boon, when your artwork revolves around fish - and we’re assured that none of the pieces was created with digital trickery. In other words, those fish are definitely, definitely wearing hats. His other works include sculpture, photography, painting, installation and video.

A recent moving image piece mixed footage from a 1980 Panorama documentary about nuclear attacks with the artist’s own film shot at The Kelvedon Hatch ‘Secret Bunker’ (a large underground bunker in Brentwood, maintained during the Cold War as a potential regional government headquarters), paintings of imagined streets in Blitz-era Europe, and a voiceover narration by Munks’ mother discussing the Silver End modernist village in Essex.

Photography: Tim Bowditch

Photography: Tim Bowditch

Photography: Tim Bowditch

Photography: Tim Bowditch

Photography: Tim Bowditch

Photography: Tim Bowditch

Photography: Tim Bowditch

Photography: Tim Bowditch