Street photographs by Polly Braden that shed light on modern life in London’s Square Mile

All images courtesy of Hoxton Mini Press and Polly Braden. © Polly Braden

Millions pass through London’s Square Mile – also known as the City of London – yet few are aware of its true significance. As we edge closer to March 2019’s Brexit deadline, a new photographic study by Polly Braden, shot over 12 years, puts a spotlight on the ‘City within the city’ at the core of global finance.

A self-contained kingdom, it's so important it has its own Lord Mayor and police force; its history is rich and complex, with repercussions that are all too real today. Together with mini-essays written by world-renowned historian David Kynaston, these ethereal photographs of people captured amongst imposing architecture begin to decode one of the most cryptic and influential parts of the capital.

"The modern City has become a self-perpetuating, absurdly over-rewarded island, too much cut off from the rest of Britain. But it would be a shame, even a tragedy if it were ever to lose completely its own very particular specialness," writes David Kynaston in the book's introduction.

Polly Braden is a British documentary photographer whose work examines the relationship between people and the environment in which they find themselves. This is her fifth photography book. Her Square Mile series was shot between 2007-2018.

London’s Square Mile by Polly Braden with text by David Kynaston is published by Hoxton Mini Press. To find out more about Polly Braden, visit pollybraden.com.

© Polly Braden

© Polly Braden

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© Polly Braden