Photographs from the last 100 years show different perspectives on everyday life and its banality

Annie at Church, Slab City (USA), 2018 © Laura Henno. All images courtesy of the artists and Institut pour la Photographie. Via submission.

If you want to get a sense of how we live today compared to previous generations, then a series of exhibitions at Institut pour la Photographie in Lille will give you a fascinating insight.

Bringing together seven shows until 15 December, as well as events and workshops, Extraordinary: Photographic Perspectives on Everyday Life covers the history of photography from the end of the 19th century to today and reflects different photographic approaches and styles, with a selection of works from around the world that explore everyday life and its banality.

Who can we expect to see? The Institut begins by paying tribute to photographer Lisette Model with an exhibition featuring four great figures of American photography who were inspired by her work: Leon Levinstein, Diane Arbus, Rosalind Fox Solomon and Mary Ellen Mark.

You can also see the work of Laura Henno, a photographer who, since 2017, has immersed herself in the lost city of Slab City in the heart of the Californian desert. The show entitled Radical Devotion will reveal previously unseen images from her ongoing project.

Thomas Struth is another highlight. He gives us a glimpse of our relationship with everyday life through a documentary approach that is "carefully crafted to reveal the complexity of the ordinary". From 1986, his psychological and sociological portraits of families revisit the traditional genre of family portraiture.

Home Sweet Home 1970 – 2018: The British Home, a Political History brings together thirty artists, across generations, to show us everyday life in Britain, where interiors are intertwined with politics.

The Institute also presents two new exhibitions on the reappropriation of vernacular photography. Beijing World Park, a new project from artist and collector Thomas Sauvin, is dedicated to tourism and our relationship to monuments. Whilst Emmanuelle Fructus' meticulous photomontages reflect on this popular practice's codes of social representation.

Finally, Paolo Cirio's Street Ghosts project takes over public spaces with an installation that questions the notions of image rights, public space and privacy laws, using shots from Google Street View. Discover more about what's happening and when via www.institut-photo.com.

© McCoy Wynne

© McCoy Wynne

Jeff Gilman and Stacy Spiyey, Mc Kee, Kentucky © Mary Ellen Mark. Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery

Jeff Gilman and Stacy Spiyey, Mc Kee, Kentucky © Mary Ellen Mark. Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery

Signs of the Times © Martin Parr

Signs of the Times © Martin Parr

June Street, Salford, 1973 © Daniel Meadows, Martin Parr – Magnum Photos

June Street, Salford, 1973 © Daniel Meadows, Martin Parr – Magnum Photos

Beijing Silvermine © Thomas Sauvin

Beijing Silvermine © Thomas Sauvin

Beijing Silvermine © Thomas Sauvin

Beijing Silvermine © Thomas Sauvin

The Smith Family, Fife 1989 © Thomas Struth

The Smith Family, Fife 1989 © Thomas Struth

Older Couple in a Bar, New York City © Leon Levinstein. Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery

Older Couple in a Bar, New York City © Leon Levinstein. Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery

Timmy and Kasey, Slab City (USA), 2018 © Laura Henno

Timmy and Kasey, Slab City (USA), 2018 © Laura Henno