Photographs by Samar Baiomy that document the impact of rising seas on Alexandria's 'Little Venice'

All images courtesy of Samar Baiomy

Visual artist Samar Baiomy has spent the last two years documenting the demolishment of houses in Alexandria's 'Little Venice' in Egypt, picking out details of internal walls and discarded items to pay homage to the people who once lived there.

Known as the El-Max (المكس‎) region, the poor fishing community has become victim to climate change, as rising seas cause flooding along its central canal. Now the government is pulling down houses and buildings in the area.

"I wanted to remember the memories and history of these houses," Samar tells Creative Boom. "Even though it might be hard to see amidst the dust and peeling paint, it's still there. Houses and walls live with us daily and remind us of the memories that happen inside our homes. So I wanted to document this place because it is historical and will be a forgotten over time."

Located where the River Nile meets the Mediterranean Sea, El Max originated thousands of years ago. "This distinctive location attracted certain professions and gave its people distinct features unique from the rest of the marine cities located along the coast of the Mediterranean," she adds. "In the past, El Max was a bridge of communication with the world and witnessed so much history right back to ancient times. How sad that it now lies in ruins."

In her photographs, we see so much of El-Max's past. "I focused on the remains of life, such as chairs, wallpaper, and clothes left behind. Their memories should live on forever," Samar adds.

Samar Baiomy studied video art and photography at the Higher Arts School (ESAAIX) in Aix-en-Provence, France, before obtaining a Master of Arts in 2018. She is currently a PhD researcher after working as a teaching assistant at the Faculty of Art and Design at Pharos University for five years. Discover more on Behance.

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy

© Samar Baiomy