Quintessenz creates stunning rainbow installation of mesh material on the island of Paxos

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

When Hannover and Berlin-based artists Thomas Granseuer and Tomislav Topic, otherwise known as Quintessenz, were scouting for a location for their next installation, they came across a 400-year old ruin in the little village of Kagatika in Paxos.

Deciding it was the perfect backdrop, they used a mesh material in 120 different colours with each layer seemingly bursting from the ruined building's former windows. Called Kagkatika's Secret, it was created as part of the Paxos Contemporary Art Project.

"The work unfolds in an approximately 400-year-old ruin and forms a unique contrast," says Tomislav. "It is detached from the usual city bustle and is not in competition with glaring lights or obtrusive advertising. The wind and the sunlight make the installation appear like a digital body in the real world. It forms the interface between analogue and digital, between today and then and between old and new.

"The great contrast makes the installation look almost unreal, as soon as the wind settles in the layers and the sunlight underlines the colours even more, it seems as if there is only one place for this installation. This, in turn, the contrast fits in and creates exciting synergies."

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz

Credits: Jewgeni Roppel / Quintessenz