Photography

New Queer Photography spread
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All images courtesy and copyright of Bryce Watanasoponwongs
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All images courtesy and copyright of Teresa Freitas
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All images courtesy and copyright of Laurent Kronental
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All images courtesy of Michael Nguyen
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All images courtesy of the artist
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© Jeremy Snell. All images courtesy of the artist and Setanta Books
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All images courtesy of the artist and The Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Florida
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All images courtesy of Barbara Cole. Via direct submission.
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© Simon Buckley
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Simon Kojo Sackey © Marge Bradshaw
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All images courtesy of the photographer. © Andrew Thomas Shea
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Battersea Park © Paul Campbell Photographer
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Of The Land and Sea © Nick Walker
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Not all viruses lead to global pandemics. Some have evolved to our benefit. An ancient virus called HERV-K may protect human embryos from other viruses, according to Joanna Wysocka, a professor of both chemical and systems biology and of developmental biology at Stanford University. When an embryo reaches the eight-cell stage (as projected at left), HERV-K is activated and may nudge the cells to build proteins that shield them from infection. It turns off when the embryo implants in the uterus. Ancient viruses make up nearly 8 percent of human DNA, with HERV-K joining an ancestor's genome more than 30 million years ago. Scientists like Wysocka are continuing to untangle how viruses have become a part of us. (Craig Cutler/National Geographic)
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75°. Bill Vanderslice, Port Charlotte, FL. Courtesy of Danelle Manthey
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