Six art exhibitions not to be missed in London this October

Rebecca Ackroyd, installation view of group exhibition Walled Gardens in an Insane Eden, Z20 Sara Zanin Gallery, Rome, 2017. Courtesy of the artist.

London is constantly spoilt with a huge dose of art and culture. If you're struggling to decide what to see this October, and you fancy something a little off the beaten track, then allow Creative Boom to help. We've picked out five of the capital's best exhibitions this month, offering something to suit all tastes.

1. Ties II: Pietro Consagra & Marine Hugonnier

Pietro Consagra & Ugo Mulas at the Italian Cultural Institute. Courtesy of Artuner

Pietro Consagra & Ugo Mulas at the Italian Cultural Institute. Courtesy of Artuner

Ties II: Pietro Consagra & Marine Hugonnier will see abstract sculptures from the 1960-80s by leading post-war Italian sculptor, Pietro Consagra, placed into dialogue with new collages by contemporary French artist, Marine Hugonnier, from her ongoing ‘Art for Modern Architecture’ series, set against the magnificent backdrop of the Italian Cultural Institute.

The exhibition, which is curated by Artuner, will explore how both artists challenge cultural and historical frameworks to establish a new relationship between the viewer and their environment.

Italian Cultural Institute | Running until 20 November

2. Dmitri Prigov. Theatre of Revolutionary Action

Dimitri Prigov. Theatre of Revolutionary Action, installation view, 2017. Courtesy of Calvert 22

Dimitri Prigov. Theatre of Revolutionary Action, installation view, 2017. Courtesy of Calvert 22

Calvert 22 Foundation is hosting the first posthumous solo presentation of Dmitri Prigov’s work in the UK. Prigov (1940 – 2007) was one of the leading figures of Moscow Conceptualism and is known for his varied and prolific work as a poet, performer and artist using installation, video, typewritten books and other media.

This particular show will reflect on the different ways theatricality and performance influenced Prigov’s oeuvre, focusing primarily on his work after the fall of the Soviet Union. Part of the The Future Remains: Revisiting Revolution season at Calvert 22 Foundation marking the centenary of 1917, the exhibition will look back on the Soviet experiment and the ways Prigov harnessed ideological, philosophical and mystical languages to address themes of chaos, change and death.

Calvert 22 Foundation | Until 17 December

3. Sophie Ryder: Tepozteco

Sophie Ryder in the studio | Photography © Anne Purkiss

Sophie Ryder in the studio | Photography © Anne Purkiss

Celebrated British sculptor Sophie Ryder will present her second solo show at the gallery. Best known for her monumental public sculptures, this show will demonstrate the artist working on a more intimate scale.

Entitled Tepozteco (after a temple in Mexico), viewers will be invited to explore Ryder’s world as they navigate through the gallery, beginning on the ground floor where the artist’s newly conceived character – ‘The Boar’ – will be introduced for the first time. The basement floor of the gallery will be transformed into an immersive multi-sensory installation, ‘Temple to 200 Rabbits’, with two hundred of Ryder’s sculptures being exhibited together.

Hignell Gallery | Until 1 December

4. William Tillyer: A Retrospective

Fallingwater, 1993 by William Tillyer. Courtesy of The Fine Art Society

Fallingwater, 1993 by William Tillyer. Courtesy of The Fine Art Society

William Tillyer: A Retrospective is the first in a series of shows celebrating the acclaimed British landscape artist William Tillyer ahead of his 80th birthday in 2018. Focusing on the last forty years of his practice with over 40 works painted from 1977–2016, the exhibition provides an opportunity to consider the breadth and multiplicity of Tillyer’s oeuvre.

Throughout his sixty-year career, critics have struggled to categorise Tillyer's work; he has been described as a romantic and as a classicist, as a traditionalist and a modernist. The Fine Art Society’s exhibition re-addresses this criticism, connecting the threads between the different periods of his career and demonstrating that he has always remained true to his artistic vision.

The Fine Art Society | Until 25 October

5. Eileen Cooper RA: Till the Morning Comes

Let it Be, Eileen Cooper. Courtesy of the artist.

Let it Be, Eileen Cooper. Courtesy of the artist.

Eileen Cooper’s first solo exhibition launches at the Fine Art Society gallery this month. Entitled Till the Morning Comes, the show will feature new paintings and a series of drawings inspired by English National Ballet’s recent production of Giselle, choreographed by Akram Khan.

Throughout her career, Cooper’s bold and dynamic paintings have presented a complex, somewhat dream-like vision of the world. Her images of women, couples, families and animals, are filled with a sense of energy and movement. She often shows her subjects engaged in creative work, performance and dance through richly suggested environments. She has an abiding interest in female identity and in the notions of creativity, love, sexuality and human relationships. Not to be missed.

The Fine Art Society | From 30 October until 21 November

6. The Root by Rebecca Ackroyd

Rebecca Ackroyd, Carrier 2017. Photo by Ben Westoby. Courtesy of the artist.

Rebecca Ackroyd, Carrier 2017. Photo by Ben Westoby. Courtesy of the artist.

The metaphoric association between body and building is a recurring motif in London artist Rebecca Ackroyd’s work: pipes become limbs and vents become orifices. For this exhibition, she has produced a sculptural installation that responds directly to the architecture of the gallery space, covering and inverting its surfaces in a manner that suggests a turning inside out.

Three sculptures evoking battered and charred shutters cover the interior windows, their top head sections pasted with images of side alleys and graffiti marked metal doors in the vicinity of the artist’s studio. On the gallery floor is a patterned carpet reminiscent of a traditional pub, in the centre of which sits a sculpture of a metal manhole cover. Here connotations of masculinity are mixed with the feeling of the escape of energy into a black void below.

Zabludowicz Collection, London | Until 5 November


Main image: Rebecca Ackroyd, installation view of group exhibition Walled Gardens in an Insane Eden, Z20 Sara Zanin Gallery, Rome, 2017. Courtesy of the artist