Five places for creatives to find design inspiration in Berlin

in Inspiration / Travel

When it comes to creative capitals, there aren’t many as uber cool as Berlin. As a designer, you’ll be overwhelmed with the many galleries, museums, architectural sites and bookshops the German city has to offer.

From the streets laden with artistic graffiti, to the industrial buildings looming above, there’s inspiration to be found at every twist and turn. Here we’ve picked out five of our recommendations for finding design inspiration on your next visit…

1. KW Institute for Contemporary Art

Credit: Ian Wilson, Circle on the floor (Chalk Circle), 1968, unlimited edition. Courtesy of the artist and Jan Mot, Brussels. Installation view KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2017.  Photo: Frank Sperling.

Credit: Ian Wilson, Circle on the floor (Chalk Circle), 1968, unlimited edition. Courtesy of the artist and Jan Mot, Brussels. Installation view KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2017. Photo: Frank Sperling.

The KW Institute for Contemporary Art aims to “approach the central questions of our times" through "production, display, and dissemination". Since being formed 25 years ago, KW has played an important role in the Berlin art scene, through its exhibitions and lively events.

Entry priced at €8 | Visit the website

2. Museum of Decorative Arts

Credit: © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Altes Museum / Valerie Schmidt, 2016.

Credit: © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Altes Museum / Valerie Schmidt, 2016.

The oldest of its kind in Germany, the Museum of Decorative Arts houses a vast collection of European pieces across its two sites. At Cultureforum, near to Potsdamer Platz, masterpieces and object art exists from as early as the Middle Ages. At Schloss Köpenick, the focus is furniture and decorative arts from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo periods.

Entry priced from €6 | Visit the website

3. The Museum of Things

Credit: © Werkbundarchiv - Museum der Dinge / Photo: Armin Herrmann.

Credit: © Werkbundarchiv - Museum der Dinge / Photo: Armin Herrmann.

Presenting a collection of cultural items of the 20th century – over 40,000, in fact – including a documented history of the Deutsche Werkbund (German Association of Craftsmen), alongside various exhibitions – from Berlin after 1945, to The "Frankfurter Küche", which examines the influence of industrialism on the home – the museum presents an immersive opportunity for a journey of discovery.

Entry priced at €6 | Visit the website

4. Bauhaus Museum

Credit: The Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung in Berlin (1976-79), architects: Walter Gropius, Alex Cvijanovic and Hans Bandel. Photo: Karsten Hintz.

Credit: The Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung in Berlin (1976-79), architects: Walter Gropius, Alex Cvijanovic and Hans Bandel. Photo: Karsten Hintz.

No design guide to Berlin would be complete without a mention for the Bauhaus Museum. The archive, founded in 1960 as a private society, had a core aim "to collect and present all documents relating to the activities and cultural and intellectual heritage of the Bauhaus". As such, the archive includes photography, books, artworks and models.

Entry priced from €7 | Visit the website

5. Berlinische Galerie

Credit: Berlinische Galerie, Haupteingang © Photo: Nina Straßgütl.

Credit: Berlinische Galerie, Haupteingang © Photo: Nina Straßgütl.

With a specific focus on art created in Berlin, between 1870 and now, the Berlinische Galerie is an engaging space filled with paintings, graphics, sculpture, multimedia photography and architecture. Collections of note include Dada Berlin, Neue Sachlichkeit and Eastern European avant-garde. The art of the divided Berlin and the reunited metropolis is also a focal point.

Entry priced at €8 | Visit the website

Main image credit: Berlinische Galerie, Treppenhalle © Photo: Nina Straßgüt

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